This is a dramatic piece, measuring 13" at its widest and 4.5" tall.  It's made from a portion of a basswood burl that encircled the entire trunk.  I had to cut it in pieces before I could do anything with it, as it was so large.  The white wood of the burl has beautiful chatoyance and depth, and the dark, barky streaks throughout the piece give it character and texture.  It's finished with many coats of pure tung oil, then rubbed with a beeswax/oil final finish.  $195.

An old maple burl had an interior piece that was too contorted and gnarly for either a natural-edge bowl or a finished-edge bowl, so that piece turned into what you see here.  It has cracks (stabilized with cyanoacrylate glue) along with some spalting and nice chatoyance in the stressed wood.  It's turned only once, so it has inherent waves in the surfaces and a little warp in the circle.  Measuring 8.5" across and 3" high, it's finished with several coats of resin/oil finish. $100

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This is a small bowl from a maple burl that a logger almost threw away.  It's only 6" wide and 3" high, but it has grain typical to sugar maple burls.  It's finished with several coats of oil/resin that make it durable and give it a nice touch. $80

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Quite frankly, this was a pain to turn, but it turned out to be very unique.  I had a number of large red oaks fall on my property, and I kept some of the crotches to see if I could get something nice out of them. After starting with a much larger piece, and hours of turning and sanding rock-hard oak, I finally ended up with this piece.  It's only once-turned to about 1/4", so it's warped a bit from all of the natural stresses found in tree crotches.  The oil/resin finish highlights the deep chatoyance of the wood. 8.25" wide and 2.5" tall. $125.

This basswood burl comes from a portion of a very large burl I bought from a logger in 2015.  It has nice chatoyance in the white areas, and interesting character with the interspersed bark.  It's finished with pure tung oil and beeswax.  About 8" wide and 3" tall.  $95.  Item #102

I was getting my son's cello fixed by a local handyman, and out in his open shed he had a couple of very old, dry, and ugly burls in a pile. We quickly negotiated a price for both of them. Later, I mounted the oak one on a lathe to find out what I had bought.  After many hours of turning and sanding, and some cyanoacrylate glue to stabilize the soft bits and cracks, this is what came out.  It's fairly large (12" across and 6" high), sanded to 800 grit and finished in a tung oil/resin finish.  $135

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     Paul's bowls are made from logs mostly sourced near his home in north central Minnesota.  Since each log is different, each bowl will be different. Some bowls are natural edged (showing the bark of the tree and its curvature), some involve a finished, perfectly circular edge, and some are hybrids -- it depends on the piece of wood.  Part of the fun of turning is guessing what's inside a log, and often being surprised and disappointed (the firewood pile is full of failed bowls). 

     Some of the finished-edge bowls are "twice-turned," meaning they were first turned to about an inch of thickness, then dried and allowed to warp, then turned a second time to make them round again.  Any bowl that has not been twice-turned will show the natural warping of the wood as it dried -- this is part of the beauty and character of a natural wood product. When the wood is strong enough, Paul turns many of his bowls very thin, which makes them surprisingly light to the touch.  When he can get them, Paul also makes many bowls from burls, which are growths on trees that often contain wild grain and visual depth (called "chatoyance"). Burls are rare, and he often has to purchase them from local loggers.

     Once turned, all of Paul's bowls are dried for several months and maybe even years, and then sanded to at least 800 grit and finished with a durable tung oil or a tung oil/resin finish. 

    All bowls are priced below.  If you live in Minnesota, I have to add state and local taxes, and if shipped, $15.00 for UPS.  They're guaranteed -- if you don't like a bowl, please return it for a full refund of the cost of the bowl. 

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This is one of the thinnest bowls I've ever turned.  It's the crotch of a wild cherry tree.  It was perfectly round when I took it off the lathe, wet, but within a day the wood had dried and warped.  It's about 7.5" wide, 1.5" tall, and about 1/8" thick, and weighs less than 2 oz.  $105. 

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It's hard for a photo to show the uniqueness of this bowl turned from an old maple burl.  Along with a burl's typical swirly grain and crags, it also has some blue staining from fungus.  Some of the bark survived the turning experience, but about half of the edge is barkless.  It's a large, impressive piece, 10.5" wide and 3.25" tall.  $135.

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This is a traditional natural edged bowl made from a huge white oak my son and I cut down one Christmas Break (we won't do that again -- it was a little scary when it crashed down).  The most interesting part of white oak is its very thick and craggy bark, which provides a lot of interesting character.  It's 8.5' long and 5" high, and turned very thin to about 1/4' thick.  $95.  #105

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This burl bowl is from the burl that bounced around in the logger's pickup for a year.  It also has several filled cracks, showing it's gnarly character. It's about 7" across and 3" high, with an oil/resin finish.  $95

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This bowl is from a sugar maple log I bought from a logger north of Brainerd.  I thought it was full of burls, but when I got into it, I found out they were only old branch collars mostly filled with partially decomposed wood. Nonetheless, I turned a bowl from it because the stressed wood around the collar had such chatoyance and I couldn't throw it away (but I haven't bothered turning any more because it was such a pain to work with).  This is a bowl with character, as it has small open cracks in the bottom and, because it's been turned only once, it has some warping from the drying.  It's finished with several coats of oil/resin finish and measures 9.5-10" across, 2.5" high and 1/4 - 3/8" thick.  $95

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This was part an old dried oak burl that didn't have long for the world if it had been left to keep decomposing.  The bark wouldn't stay on, and it has some drying cracks that had to be filled and stabilized with glue.  But it's got a beautiful grain and great character (just like some of us older folks). It's 8.25 - 9.5" across, about 3" high, and about 1/4" thick, and finished with several coats of an oil/resin.  $110

During the winter of 2015, a logger sold me some sugar maple logs.  I made a number of bowls from them, including this fairly large natural edge bowl. It's turned thin, only about 1/4" thick, and measures 9.25" across and 4.5" high.  Finished in an oil/resin, it will last a lifetime. $95


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This is the first burl I turned, with great trepidation.  It's from a dying wild cherry tree on my hunting property that I had eyed for several years. I realized the tree was dying and that I needed to cut it out before it became too rotten.  It took some glue (and some prayers) to hold it together while it was spinning at 800 rpm on the lathe.  It's slowly turning a darker red every year, as cherry tends to do.    It's 12" at the widest, and 3" high. nfs

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A woodworker friend of mine gave me a number of dried aspen burls that he didn't want anymore.  Most were too small to do much with, or were too cracked and dry.  One, however, had a couple of small burls next to each other, so I turned them as a pair, with the end result being two wings.  It has nice chatoyance and depth.  There are a number of cracks that have not been filled, but the piece is structurally stable for the long term.  It's 9.5" long, 5" wide, and 2.5" high.  $95. 

This bowl is another product of the July, 2015 windstorm in our area that knocked down hundreds of thousands of trees in a few hours.  This is a very large black ash bowl from a tree felled in a swampy area (where black ash often grow).  It's 12.5" long, 10" wide, 4" tall, and about 3/8" thick.  $125, #101

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Both of these are black walnut and made from downed wood from Sally's family farm in Iowa. They're both a little under 9" across, about 1/4" thick, and almost 4" high. They're finished with an oil resin finish. $75 each. 

Keep checking here! My workshop is full of bowls that need sanding or second turnings!

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This twice-turned bowl comes from a nice-sized paper birch from my property. With interesting grain and a matte finish, it looks nice alone or filled with fruit. It's 10.5' wide and 4" tall, finished in oil/resin.  $95, #104 

Most of the birch trees in our yard are slowly dying, and I've made a lot of bowls from them when they reach their end. This is a twice-turned bowl, with an inset rim wrapped with silk thread from Sally's weaving supplies‚Äč to give it even more character.  The wood shows some blue staining from natural fungus present in dying wood.  It's finished with an oil/resin finish and measures 9.25" across and 4.25" high, with a thickness of about 3/8".  $95

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Trees, when left to rot on the forest floor, get filled with fungus and other nasty things.  In birch and other light woods, this fungus can create lines, called spalting, that can be very beautiful (and dangerous to your lungs if you don't wear protection).  The challenge is to work the wood at just the right time: too soon, and the lines are limited; too late, and the wood has gone soft and "punky."  Punky wood tears badly when turned, and can sometimes be irredeemable (look at my burn pile). This birch log was a bit on the late side, so the I had to soak the entire bowl with cyanoacrylate glue to make it workable and had to sand it, seemingly forever, to get a good, very hard finish.  It's not that big - 6" across" and 2" high, but it's one-of-a-kind.  $125.  

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This cherry bowl is another more product of the large storm that ripped through Brainerd in July of 2015, knocking down hundreds of thousands of trees.  A couple hundred of those trees were on my 40 acres of hunting land in west Baxter.  One tree was an old wild cherry tree, large for wild cherry at about 10" diameter. The bowl on the right is an end-grain turned piece from the stump  Like all cherry, the brownish wood will continue to darken to a deep blood red over the next year or so.  Finished with an oil/resin. 8.5" at widest, and 2.75" tall $110.

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This large, shallow bowl is from a maple burl a friend found for me.  It has patchy blue coloring from fungus, and is partially natural-edged.   A crack (upper left in left photo) has been completely filled and shows that no one is perfect. It's 11.25" wide, 1.5" tall, and super thin at 1/4" or less.  For the heck of it, I weighed it, and it's only 8 oz. $120. 

This is a small bowl turned from a gnarly old maple burl -- so old, the bark would not stay on, but the natural edge is retained.  In addition to being a burl, it has some "spalting," which are lines of mineral deposits caused by fungus in wood in the early stage of decay.  It's only 5.5" high, about 4.5" across, and about a 1/4" thick.  $90

The maple logger also threw in an old maple burl that had been bouncing around in the back of his pickup truck for a year.  He didn't know if it was any good anymore. It was dried and cracked, but had some beautiful grain, so I did what I could with it -- with some patience and crack-filling with glue, it turned out to be a beautiful piece of wood.  It measures 10.5" a the widest, about 1.5" high, and 1/4" thick.  It's nicely warped to remind us it's a natural piece of wood. Finished with an oil/resin finish. $120